Flora and fauna funds flow

Members of the Upper Campaspe Landcare Network are pictured on the Campaspe River at the launch of their strategic plan.
The UCLN recently received news that they - as well as four of their member groups - were successful in receiving $204,000 as part of the recent Biodiversity On Ground Action Grants to  enable them to work on projects aimed at protecting the environment in central Victoria. Photo: Sandy Scheltema

Members of the Upper Campaspe Landcare Network are pictured on the Campaspe River at the launch of their strategic plan. The UCLN recently received news that they - as well as four of their member groups - were successful in receiving $204,000 as part of the recent Biodiversity On Ground Action Grants to enable them to work on projects aimed at protecting the environment in central Victoria. Photo: Sandy Scheltema

The UCLN will work in conjunction with the environmental officer from Macedon Ranges Shire Council and 15 community groups to confirm the presence of powerful owls and other vulnerable species in the Central Highlands. Photo: Sandy Scheltema

The UCLN will work in conjunction with the environmental officer from Macedon Ranges Shire Council and 15 community groups to confirm the presence of powerful owls and other vulnerable species in the Central Highlands. Photo: Sandy Scheltema

The Upper Campaspe Landcare Network and four of its member groups have been acknowledged for their vital work to protect threatened flora and fauna by being awarded more than $200,000 in funding from the latest round of the state government's Biodiversity On Ground Action Grants.

Minister for Energy, Environment and Climate Change Lily D'Ambrosio announced $4 million of funding over four years for 110 community projects to protect threatened flora and fauna.

"Support has been made available for activities that help communities better understand and manage local native species and natural environments," Ms D'Ambrosio said.

UCLN facilitator Sandy Scheltema said the funding would enable the groups to continue carrying out the wonderful work they were doing in caring for our environment.

"All these important projects align with the UCLN Strategic Plan and will help our volunteers continue to work towards protecting our precious environment, including threatened species," Ms Scheltema said.

The UCLN received $46,485 to undertake citizen surveys over two years in the Central Highlands. They will work in conjunction with the environmental officer from Macedon Ranges Shire Council and 15 community groups to confirm the presence of powerful owls, greater gliders and the brush-tailed phascogale (all of which are listed as vulnerable under the Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act in Victoria). An experienced project officer will will work alongside community members to conduct the surveys and enter data on these animals into the Victorian Biodiversity Atlas.

"The information gathered will help build an important database relating to vulnerable species in our area and therefore be a step towards implementing measures to protect them," Ms Scheltema said.

Ashbourne Landcare received $49,890 to continue its biolink project linking remnant native vegetation.

President Robin Allen said the group was very pleased to receive this state government grant which was for an ambitious, two-year conservation project covering some 28 hectares of private property in the district.

"We will be undertaking revegetation to create new biolinks, and strengthening existing ones. This new project will also enable us to engage an ecologist to complete a survey commenced recently to identify local remnant species across a range of vegetation types."

The Campaspe River and Land Management Group, which focuses its activities along the Campaspe River in Kyneton, received $21,136 to continue doing riparian rehabilitation work along the river, including propagating and planting the endangered hairy anchor plant.

Friends of Bald Hill Reserve president Carolyn Robb was delighted to receive news of the $36,700 funding her group received.

"We were delighted to receive such a substantial and important grant which will address the loss of vegetation quality and habitat for plants and animals including threatened species in Bald Hill Reserve. Among other things, this three-year project will help protect the threatened matted flax-lily (Dianella amoena) population and increase our understanding of the endangered brown toadlet habitat requirements."

The Friends group and environmental officers from MRSC will be responsible for the delivery of the project.

Trentham and District Landcare was the fourth group in the network to be successful in the funding allocation. They received $50,000 to fence the Coliban River between Enders Bridge and Trentham Falls which will greatly improve the condition of the river and its environs and encourage the revegetation of native flora.