Honoured to be involved

RSL members Robin Funston (far left) and John Delai (far right) with Gisborne Secondary College captain Candice Crane, vice-captain Finn Langley, captain Dean Karopoulous and vice-captain Bridie Ashdown, prepare for Mount Macedon and Gisborne Anzac services.

RSL members Robin Funston (far left) and John Delai (far right) with Gisborne Secondary College captain Candice Crane, vice-captain Finn Langley, captain Dean Karopoulous and vice-captain Bridie Ashdown, prepare for Mount Macedon and Gisborne Anzac services.

Mount Macedon's Anzac Day dawn service this year reflects on the 75th anniversary of the fall of Singapore and the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Beersheba.

The service is one of the largest outside of Melbourne and thousands are expected to gather to pay their respects.

"At this dawn service we do not romanticise, glorify or celebrate war in any way - neither our military victories nor our defeats. We try instead to reflect on the harsh realities and costs of warfare, commemorate the sacrifices, camaraderie and resilience in adversity," a representative of the organising committee said.

As the centenary of Anzac is marked, the tradition has only grown support and younger generations continue to prove their interest and the importance Anzac history plays in school education.

Gisborne Secondary College's vice-captains Bridie Ashdown and Finn Langley, and school captains Candice Crane and Dean Karopoulous are among the students taking part in Anzac ceremonies across the shire.

Candice and Dean will each portray voices of the troopers of the charge at the Battle of Beersheba as part of the Mount Macedon dawn service. The pair say the experience is one that students look forward to.

"It's a huge honour to be involved in the Anzac Day services - the stories told and the unique things worked into the ceremonies are what makes this one of the greatest experiences of the year," Candice said.

Bridie and Finn, who will read at the Gisborne town service, expressed the same gratitude.

"We were lucky to have been taught the Anzac history from primary school through to secondary," Bridie said.

"I think it's something we should continue to learn about in schools, appreciate and honour. I was overwhelmed and felt honoured to be asked to take part in this year's Anzac Day service."

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