Biolink project continues

President of Upper Campaspe Landcare Network Alan Denehey discusses planning for the Coliban Corridor, one of the two biolink projects the network is working on to improve biodiversity along the Coliban and Campaspe Rivers, with Woodend Landcare member Kate Daniel. The group was thrilled to receive news they were successful in their funding application to continue the work which involves six landcare groups working together to improve biodiversity along the rivers and their surrounds. Photo: Sandy Scheltema

President of Upper Campaspe Landcare Network Alan Denehey discusses planning for the Coliban Corridor, one of the two biolink projects the network is working on to improve biodiversity along the Coliban and Campaspe Rivers, with Woodend Landcare member Kate Daniel. The group was thrilled to receive news they were successful in their funding application to continue the work which involves six landcare groups working together to improve biodiversity along the rivers and their surrounds. Photo: Sandy Scheltema

A $10,000 Landcare Community Grant will enable the Upper Campaspe Landcare Network group to continue its work towards the creation of two biolinks: the Coliban Connections, and the Cobaw Campaspe Connections.

Seven landcare groups within the network (Ashbourne, Trentham, Tylden, Malmsbury, Woodend, Carlsruhe and Newham) will continue working together towards their goal of protecting areas of precious native vegetation and establishing two biolinks in the network's area, focusing on the Coliban and Campaspe Rivers and their surrounds.

The groups aim is to restore connectivity between areas of remnant vegetation so as to create corridors for the movement and protection of indigenous plants and animals.

The landcare groups will be working towards improving biodiversity in the areas by identifying threatened species which need to be protected, and improving their habitat requirements. Some of the threats to these areas are feral species (such as cats, foxes, and rabbits), weeds, and habitat clearing.

The grant will enable the network to start addressing these threats and their impact on native species, some of which are endangered.

President of UCLN, Alan Denehey, said they were trying to reverse the degradation of the natural environment that had occurred in the past.

"We are trying to slow that down, reverse it, repair it," Mr Denehey said.

"We will be identifying and finding focal species.

"Given that we are trying to revegetate and create interconnected wildlife corridors, we are keen to engage landowners in our aim of creating native vegetation corridors as part of these landscape scale projects.

"We see this as a win for the environment and for the landowners through improved property amenity and farm efficiency."